The annual PHP pre-employment training is ON. Here's a sneak peek behind the scene

The annual PHP pre-employment training is ON. Here's a sneak peek behind the scene

We’re kicking off our annual PHP pre-employment training today and couldn’t be more excited to see what the next 10 weeks have in store for us and our selected trainees.

A young squad of 6 trainees are up for a challenge designed to give them an integrative perspective of PHP development processes.

Similar to last year’s edition, the first part of the training consists of a 6 week applied course on PHP basics and the second part will focus on using a specific framework in an applied team project in Magento. During this time the young squad will learn, work with and implement design principles, best practices, design patterns, environment tools, custom models and custom core functionalities.They’ll get to attend and deliver tech presentations, work on team projects as well as individual assignments and take part in a diverse range of soft-skills training. And if all goes well, the door will be open for them to kick-start their careers, here in Evozon.

Formalities aside, let’s scoop a bit deeper.

As it is, we have one of the best technical teams in Transylvania and it’s definitely a joyous affair to be working side-by-side with goal-driven professionals who take pride in their work and jump at the chance to share their knowledge.

These techies invest a lot of time and effort to prepare and deliver a high-end training and ultimately, a worthwhile experience. But what exactly drives them? It takes a certain kind of mindset and it’s definitely something we value here, in Evozon.

For you to get an insight into our growth-culture, straight from the source, we’ve asked this year’s team of trainers to share some thoughts on the mentoring process that’s about to start. During this upcoming week, we’ll introduce a short Q&A with each trainer and as such, you’ll have the opportunity to see who’s behind “the scene” and what they have to say.

Trainees, you might want to pay attention ;).

Let’s start off with Calin & Andra.

Calin P. - Senior Symfony Developer

What motivates you to get involved in training interns?

The motivation comes twofold – one is the personal benefit I gain from it and the other is the general benefit. My personal benefit is that it forces me to remember stuff others consider trivial or common knowledge, but surprisingly you forget a lot of stuff. Generally, it’s nice when you find that guy or girl who is able to easily tackle anything you throw at them – you can already see yourself working with them side by side.

Which training approach do you prefer and why: “blueprints” or “freestyle”?

Obviously “the freestyle” because I’ve been doing training for a bunch of years now. I don’t think I have more than 10 trainings held with a PowerPoint presentation. It feels easier to adapt to the look on their faces and their questions. But I need to have an agenda (planning-wise) and make sure that I touch that agenda.

What’s the hardest thing to teach?

I won’t say the hardest thing to teach is technical. Trainees see the internship as a competition against one another. We have teamwork projects, where they need to act as a team. They usually tend to be selfish at the beginning. So, teamwork is the hardest to teach while shifting their mindset away from “competition”.

How does this experience benefit you?

As I mentioned, people consider stuff to be trivial and they don’t pay attention to trivial stuff. This helps me refresh my memory. Also, If I manage to explain something to someone, that means I have a solid grasp on that subject.

Tell us the story of your friendship with PHP.

It’s sort of a love-hate type of relationship. I’ve always done PHP – like since I’ve started programming. It’s easy to achieve stuff, it’s hard to publish stuff and it’s really hard to control the outside world – it’s hard to expose a library and to make sure nobody uses it as you don’t want it to be used.

What advice would you give to your trainees?

Enjoy the ride. It's a tough but fun one, but then again, it's no different than what happens on actual projects. Don't cherry pick information, pay attention to what the trainer is underlining. Have FUN!

Andra B. - Magento Developer

What motivates you to get involved in training interns?

Having recently been an intern myself, I understand the challenges they're facing and think I can help "smooth the ride". Also, I'm very grateful for the experience and knowledge I've gained and can’t wait to help others develop their own skills :)

Which training approach do you prefer and why: “blueprints” or “freestyle”?

I’m not sure either is a particularly good idea. I do favour a more structured approach, but I think a mix of both is needed if the goal is helping a diverse group of people learn the same things.

What’s the hardest thing to teach?

The skills/concepts that you use every day, because odds are that you’ve forgotten what it was like when they were new and strange.

How does this experience benefit you?

Well, they say that revisiting the basics of your field deepens your understanding of it. Also, on a related note, you can’t really claim you’ve mastered something until you’re able to teach it.

Tell us the story of your friendship with PHP.

It was a chance encounter that bloomed into a full-blown love affair :) I learned programming on my own and found PHP to be more flexible and intuitive to use than other languages I’ve crossed paths with.

What advice would you give to your trainees?

Be honest and accurate about what you actually know and don’t know, so we can work on the gaps together.

That’s it for now. Stay tuned and don’t hesitate to get in touch if you want to know more about our team.


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