PHP Pre-employment: insight from trainees  - part III

PHP Pre-employment: insight from trainees - part III

As we’re getting closer and closer towards the finish line, a mixed vibe of accomplishment, nostalgia and curiosity for what’s next is roaming around the training room. Despite it, there’s no time to waste, just knowledge to gain. So, the young squad is still head first in the depths of the Magento framework, coding their way to deliver the team project. We have a strong feeling it’s going to be a good one, so we’re really looking forward to seeing the result of all the hard work invested in the last weeks.

In the meantime, let’s cover the last bit of the trainees’ Q&A series we started not so long ago. It’s Rares & Sergiu’s turn to shine. Let’s see what they have to say.

Sergiu

Tell us a bit about yourself and your friendship story with programming.

I like video games, I like computers, I’ve wanted to be a programmer since I was 15 years old, when I didn’t even know how actual code looked like.

Why Evozon? Why PHP?

Evozon was my first choice, heard a lot of good stuff about the people and the company’s environment. It is true, I like everybody I work with.

How does this experience benefit you?

I wanted to learn something new and at a higher level than I used to study at University so I chose one of the longest internships because I thought these people might teach me a lot of stuff if it lasts so long.

Name one thing you hope to achieve at the end of the internship. And tell us why.

I want to get hired or at least be content with the knowledge I gathered here.

What’s your daily internship regimen/routine?

Come to work, make coffee, go smoke a cigarette and talk with colleagues, spend time with trainers/mentors, code, drink coffee, code, smoke, code, coffee, FATAL ERROR: STACK OVERFLOW EXCEPTION.

Is this “work” or “training” for you? Please explain.

This is work and training but I consider it more training than work because the company doesn’t get any profit from me, yet.

What was the coolest thing to learn (so far)?

Everything…and colleague’s names because I like everybody and I’m bad with names.

What’s your number 1 coding rule?

If you run it and it doesn’t crash you did something wrong.

Rares

Tell us a bit about yourself and your friendship story with programming.

There is a theory (called the left brain/ right brain theory) that classifies people into two main categories: persons which have an analytical/methodical way of thinking and persons which have a creative/artistic way of thinking. I see myself as a right-brained person wandering around in the (micro)world of lefties. I do value art, I love reading and writing, but I’ve reached the conclusion that being a software developer definitely does not mean rigidity from any point of view and can also be seen as a sort of art. I have been studying programming ever since high school and I have always enjoyed the problem-solving process, from understanding the requirements up to optimizing code (maybe optimization not so much). Thus, my relationship with programming is a love-hate story which, hopefully, will continue to develop into a love-only affair.

Why Evozon? Why PHP?

Let me be honest about this one. I came here knowing little to nothing about PHP, besides the whole “you can do web stuff”. PHP is an object-oriented language and that was enough to attract me. What I love most about programming is the very core of OOP: the abstraction process, how we are able to take the real-life concept, cut down the unimportant and remain with the valuable.

Why Evozon? I heard about it from a friend 2 years ago and this year I chose to come to the Open day event and sense the vibe of such a company. I immediately enjoyed it, the people seemed nice (later I found out that they really are nice), the building is impressive, the facilities are great. Why not Evozon?

How does this experience benefit you?

I guess everybody expects me to emphasize how much my technical skills are benefited from this experience. They are, there’s always so much to learn about this field (new programming language, architectures, design principles and the list may go on for a while). For me, the biggest benefit is to experience the life in a company like this, adapt to all sorts of personalities, being able to make friends and deal with people I would not normally consider as “friend material”. What’s more, it helps me understand where I am and where I should aspire to be in a few years.

Name one thing you hope to achieve at the end of the internship. And tell us why.

At the end of the internship, I hope I will be able to answer to questions such as “What would be a good design here?” or “How can I make this work?” with a decent answer and a whole bunch of arguments. Eventually, I hope the one who asks the question will listen to me and think “He looks like he knows what he’s talking about”. This is important because, going through 3 years of college, I was able to learn a lot of stuff, but not really focus on them and fully understand their implications.

What’s your daily internship regimen/routine?

I wish I woke up around 8 AM and write about how my morning routine benefits my day. It’s not the case, I almost always find myself in the danger of being late. Fortunately, up to this date, it never happened. The internship routine is not actually a routine because we depend so much on our mentors. What’s sure is that every day a mentor teaches us something (which may or may not be new, but we do not skip steps) and after that we are “forced” into working with the new concepts such that we are able to say “I know about that, I’ve worked with it”. There’s also the great breaks on the rooftop accompanied by some quick table tennis matches and the lunch.

Is this “work” or “training” for you? Please explain.

It is a bit of both (shocking, right?). It’s training in the sense that we are still writing code which will never go “live” and mistakes are not “deadly”. There’s also the mentors which make us feel more or less like “the class of 2018”, but I really like that. It’s work in the sense that I made a commitment to be here every day and because everywhere around me I hear people who are genuinely interested in talking about programming and which are trying to solve real problems.

What was the coolest thing to learn (so far)?

I really liked learning about GIT because I used it for some time without understanding very much about it. There’s also the web server part which was briefly introduced in the first week and I really liked typing google.com in the browser and not seeing their logo, but rather seeing my program.

What’s your number 1 coding rule?

Always test new pieces of code as soon as possible because as the number of lines of code gets bigger, it’s more likely you will find yourself trapped, trying to understand where it breaks. Therefore, I never use a new method without testing it because I have often found myself in the position in which even an “if” with one condition did not do what I expected it to do.

Once again, it’s hard not to notice how the same questions and basically the same experience reveals the particularities of each individual. We can only speak for ourselves, but we very much enjoyed reading about what’s it like to fill the shoes of a trainee and we appreciate everyone’s dedication throughout the pre-employment program.

Safe to say, it's been a real pleasure to work with this year's young squad!


NO COMMENTS

Tell us what you think

Fields marked with " * " are mandatory.

We use cookies to offer you the best experience on our website. Learn more

Got it